atomsplitter

Top Fuel
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
1,942
Location
Keller, TX
Ride
2017 T-120 Black, 2020 Bobber, 1998 Trophy 1200
Took it out for a longer ride this morning and determined the suspension needs upgraded. The rear shock bottoms too quick with my lard butt in the seat and the front goes all vague when the tarmac gets knarly. Also found my left boot toe touching down on a tight left-hander under power. Can't fix the ground clearance but I can fix the lack of preload and compression/rebound damping. I'll post up what I get (leaning towards Ohlins rear shock TR729 and emulator fork kit with new progressive springs and fork cap preload adjusters).

I'll post up the results of the upgrades.
 

Kojack1970

Turbocharged
Joined
May 3, 2018
Messages
610
Location
South Grafton, MA, 01560
Ride
2016 Rocket Roadster and 2000 HD Fatboy
Very nice! I pondered the bobber black as a second bike to tool around with. They sure look pretty sharp!

My only concern was the limited ground clearance and subsequent grinding of the pegs and exhaust. Reminds me of Harley's. I bet the pegs can be raised easily, but I'm not sure about the exhaust situation.
 

atomsplitter

Top Fuel
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
1,942
Location
Keller, TX
Ride
2017 T-120 Black, 2020 Bobber, 1998 Trophy 1200
Very nice! I pondered the bobber black as a second bike to tool around with. They sure look pretty sharp!

My only concern was the limited ground clearance and subsequent grinding of the pegs and exhaust. Reminds me of Harley's. I bet the pegs can be raised easily, but I'm not sure about the exhaust situation.
I'll probably be mounting a forward control kit this winter which should add some ground clearance. First priority is a better rear shock and fork emulators. Contacted an Ohlins dealer to get the ball rolling.
 

Navigator

Living Legend
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
2,893
Location
Banner, WA
Ride
2009 Rocket Touring
It happens to all of us atomsplitter. With me it was about two years ago that my knees got so bad that my big bike riding days ended. I now have a BMW R1200C and recently acquired a nice 2002, low mileage, Harley Softail standard from good friend who bought it new. I dropped it within three weeks of getting it though when I leaned over a bit too far to the left while trying to get the kickstand to go all the way up. Thus, I'll be selling it soon. My old Triumph TR6C is lightweight and fun to ride but the last time I had it out, I couldn't kick start it because my beat up old right knee was hurting too much. My good friend, who was riding his 37 Flathead 45, had to start it for me in front of a bunch of people and that was embarrassing. GADS!
Vintage Pair.jpg

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I put the Heritage bags on it, getting them from a friend for $200. Fabricated the mounts from pieces of metal stock and then installed stiffeners I also installed the highway bars and the new black mirrors. Relocated the turn signals and several other upgrades; and now it's going. Dang. I'm looking to replace it with a good used Scrambler.

And most excellent bobber. I would have thought Triumph would be putting decent shocks on their bikes after all these years. The ones on my 07 Rocket were dangerous junk, which I replaced with Progressive 440s.
 
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atomsplitter

Top Fuel
Thread starter
Joined
Nov 29, 2007
Messages
1,942
Location
Keller, TX
Ride
2017 T-120 Black, 2020 Bobber, 1998 Trophy 1200
It happens to all of us atomsplitter. With me it was about two years ago that my knees got so bad that my big bike riding days ended. I now have a BMW R1200C and recently acquired a nice 2002, low mileage, Harley Softail standard from good friend who bought it new. I dropped it within three weeks of getting it though when I leaned over a bit too far to the left while trying to get the kickstand to go all the way up. Thus, I'll be selling it soon. My old Triumph TR6C is lightweight and fun to ride but the last time I had it out, I couldn't kick start it because my beat up old right knee was hurting too much. My good friend, who was riding his 37 Flathead 45, had to start it for me in front of a bunch of people and that was embarrassing. GADS!


I put the Heritage bags on it, getting them from a friend for $200. Fabricated the mounts from pieces of metal stock and then installed stiffeners I also installed the highway bars and the new black mirrors. Relocated the turn signals and several other upgrades; and now it's going. Dang. I'm looking to replace it with a good used Scrambler.

And most excellent bobber. I would have thought Triumph would be putting decent shocks on their bikes after all these years. The ones on my 07 Rocket were dangerous junk, which I replaced with Progressive 440s.
Triumph like everyone not building high end stuff goes with the cheapest stuff they can source to fit a price point (the point where you'll cough up the cash). My Bonny T-120 was the same story, better shocks (adjustable remote reservoir) , progressive fork springs with fork cap preload adjusters did the trick. I'm no longer worried about my knees or hips giving out on slow manuvers with any of my bikes.
 

Ishrub

Retired and loving it!
Joined
Feb 18, 2016
Messages
7,722
Location
Duffy, Canberra, ACT, AUSTRALIA
Ride
R3 Roadster,Sprint ST 1050 ABS, BMW R100RS sidecar
Time keeps going for sure. I told my riding buddies today I need to start acting my age. The nice older lady that rides a Spyder told me that if I can get away with not acting old I should just keep going. I really did get a bit aggravated that nobody was keeping up very well.
Well I'm sure you can use it to your benefit in the retirement home - you'll always get to the donuts first on your Zimmer! ;) :roll: :roll: :roll:
 

Ishrub

Retired and loving it!
Joined
Feb 18, 2016
Messages
7,722
Location
Duffy, Canberra, ACT, AUSTRALIA
Ride
R3 Roadster,Sprint ST 1050 ABS, BMW R100RS sidecar
They are waiting for us all someday.

Even that green is just like the old Kwaka 9 for us old folks! ;) :cool:

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22ER650M_40RGN1ALSA2CG_A_38.high.jpeg

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS first look​

Andy Greaser

Oct 06, 2021

180 Comments
Kawasaki just unveiled their new Z650RS, a tribute to their classic 650s based on the Z650 platform.
At its core, the new bike is a standard Z650 with old-school bodywork, but the new RS also shows that Kawasaki’s retro department learned a few things since developing the Z900RS.
2022 Kawasaki Z650RS


Choose Candy Emerald Green... Kawasaki photo.


2022 Kawasaki Z650RS


...or Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony. Kawasaki photo.

Meet the Z650RS​

The underpinnings of Team Green’s latest machine are borrowed from the Z650 naked. The chassis is nearly identical, and the parallel-twin engine gets the same state of tune for 67 horsepower at 8,000 rpm and 47 foot-pounds of torque at 6,700 rpm. (Common Tread previously reviewed the 2020 Ninja 650, also based on the Z650, so give that article a look if you can’t wait for a future review of the RS.)

Kawasaki Z650RS


Under the skin, the Z650RS is almost identical to the Z650 naked. Kawasaki photo.

Expect a punchy, cheerful p-twin with good manners and reasonable weight. The Z650RS retains the assist/slipper clutch and Positive Neutral Finder that makes rowing gears on the other 650s so easy. Seat height is up just half an inch over the Z650 for a total of 31.5 inches.
Moving to the wheels, the Z650RS apes its older brother with cast wheels designed to mimic classic spoked wheels.
Stock tires are Dunlop’s practical Sportmax Roadsport 2s.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS


Not everyone wants the power (or price tag) of the 900. The Z650RS should be an approachable option. Kawasaki photo.

Ergonomics and styling​

The cockpit gets the requisite flat handlebar on revised triple clamps that bring the controls closer to the rider, resulting in a more upright (read: traditional) seating position. Combined with the wide saddle, neutral footpeg position and slim fuel tank, the RS should come reasonably close to UJM ergos of old.
Let’s talk about that tank for a minute. Kawasaki got plenty of decisions right with the Z900RS, but one of the most common complaints seemed to be the bulk of the tank on that model. From the side, it had the flowing lines of the original Z models. The illusion unraveled from any other angle thanks to the tank’s width. The narrow 650 mill gave Kawi’s designers another crack at the vintage tank problem, and the Z650RS looks to come much closer to the long, thin profile of the past.

2022 Kawasaki Z650RS
A slim tank references the Z/KZ models of old. Kawasaki photo.

Other updates include a round LED headlight, an oval LED taillight, analog-style clocks with an integrated digital display, and revised engine covers. A one-slot motif appears on the heel guards, exhaust heat shield, and radiator trim pieces. I wish they’d taken the trademark “ducktail” a little farther, but we can’t have everything we want, can we?

Kawasaki Z650RS
Nice start. More ducktail, please! Kawasaki photo.

Poking around the Z650RS accessory catalog reveals some tasteful add-ons like a chrome passenger grab rail, luggage hooks, metal dash trim, and rubber knee grips to replace the section in front of the side covers.

A competitive class​

At $8,999, the Kawasaki Z650RS carries a significant premium over the Z650 ($7,349). On the other hand, it’s $200 cheaper than the slower, heavier, and more authentically retro W800. Yamaha’s XSR700 will be its natural competition at $8,499. Hopefully we’ll get our hands on a Z650RS soon to give you the full breakdown of this heritage homage.

Kawasaki Z650RS
"Vintage style with modern performance" has been tried many times. The Z650RS looks promising. Kawasaki photo.

The Z650RS will be available in Metallic Moondust Gray/Ebony and Candy Emerald Green. That’s an easy choice for me.

2022 KAWASAKI Z650RS
Price (MSRP)$8,999
Engine649 cc liquid-cooled, eight-valve, parallel twin
Transmission, final driveSix-speed, chain
Claimed horsepower67 horsepower @ 8,000 rpm
Claimed torque47 foot-pounds @ 6,700 rpm;
FrameSteel trellis
Front suspension41 mm telescopic fork, 5.1 inches of travel
Rear suspensionHorizontal back-link with adjustable preload, 4.9 inches of travel
Front brakeDual semi-floating 300 mm petal discs, dual-piston calipers, ABS
Rear brakeSingle 220 mm petal disc, single-piston caliper, ABS
Rake, trail24.0 degrees, 3.9 inches
Wheelbase55.3 inches
Fuel capacity4.0 gallons
TiresDunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2, 120/70R17 front, 160/60R17 rear
Claimed weight412.3 pounds
Warranty12 months
 
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Navigator

Living Legend
Joined
Feb 19, 2007
Messages
2,893
Location
Banner, WA
Ride
2009 Rocket Touring
I get Cycle World emails and the Kawi was featured. Looks great. The friend who I rode to the Arctic Circle with in 2015 is now pretty broken down. It's difficult for him to even ride his R100 GS Adventure so he bought a new 650 Enfield. Pretty slick bike. He installed 1.5 inch risers and ordered after-market mufflers from England that have the catalytic converters removed. The stock ones got so hot that 30 minutes after shutting the bike down, they were still too hot to touch.
 
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